Missouri: General Assembly to Take Up Pro-Gun Legislation During Tomorrow’s Veto Override Session

As reported last week, the Missouri General Assembly will meet tomorrow and Thursday to consider bills that were vetoed by Governor Jay Nixon.  Three of the bills being considered include provisions that would improve gun laws in the Show Me State.  Tomorrow, the bills will come up in their house of origination – Senate Bill 656 in the state Senate and House Bill 2002 and House Bill 2008 in the state House of Representatives – and on Thursday the opposite chamber will consider those bills if passed.  Each of these bills addresses the issue of creating a safer school environment, by making Missouri more compliant with the NRA’s School Shield program.

Florida Report: Latvala, sheriffs take out Brandes’ NRA-backed gun bill

Thursday, 5/1/14, the Florida Sheriffs Association killed SB-296/HB-209 — the bill to allow citizens to carry their firearms with them (rather than leave firearms behind for looters) when they are under a mandatory evacuation during a declared state of emergency.  Be perfectly clear, this was a straight up Second Amendment issue in its purest form.  And the Florida Sheriffs Association opposed your fundamental individual right to keep and bear arms at a time when you most need to be able to protect yourself and your family.

Iowa: Dubuque City Council Declines to Take Up Discriminatory Ordinance

Early this week, the Dubuque City Council announced that it will decline to take up a proposal that would ban future home-based firearms businesses.  This deeply flawed proposal would have targeted law-abiding gun owners and home-based Federal Firearms License (FFL) dealers by prohibiting future conditional use permits for gun sales from residential homes.  Your NRA-ILA previously reported on this issue last September as the Dubuque City Council voted 6-1 to table the discriminatory city zoning ordinance amendment.

Changes to Kansas concealed carry gun laws take effect

Starting Monday, licensed gun owners will be allowed to bring their concealed weapons into more government buildings in Kansas and people who try to bring them into places where they are prohibited won’t face criminal penalties.The provisions are part of an expansion of Kansas’ concealed carry law passed during last year’s legislative session as the federal government was discussing gun control measures in the wake of a mass shooting at a Newtown, Conn., elementary school in December. The new rules allow people with concealed carry permits to bring firearms into public buildings deemed not to have adequate security measures, such as metal detectors and trained guards.